The Many Facets of Insect Vision

Check this wonderful site to see like an insect sees!


Highlights & Resolutions for 2018

2017 was great (at least personally, maybe not nationally, LOL) so let’s propose some ways 2018 can be just as great.

1. Pleasure Reading

I loved reading material that the general public could care less about. This primarily included college textbooks, especially on science, which I have always vacillated on their worth. And most of their material tends to bear little relevance to life, unless if I work in that field after college. Basically, texts tend to choke. I’m better off reading popular books, googling the information I need (or want), which is different from a textbook (which potentially gives you a know-it-all attitude toward a whole branch of knowledge, which also varies what book is used, as those on the market differ. Again, the professor decides the text to be used.)

Reading, whether fiction or nonfiction, and for whatever audience, takes much discipline to finish by the book. I think this whole textbook craze is just a yearning to spoil my degree amidst many challenges. It is definitely worth the wait.

It’s a myth that I don’t like fiction. The truth is if I was willing to start a novel, I might get distracted, since there’s so many choices out there. And I’m not anti- nonfiction either. I love to learn, always have and always will. But, when I’m trying to get facts, the popular press suffices, whether printed or online.

2. My third (and final) community college before transfer to a university.

My first two courses at this place, Montgomery County Community College, shall be political science and a speech course. As for future courses hopefully by a university, I’ll just leave that to God for now. Suffice it to say I’ll be busier anyway, and as a perfect segue to the first note, as a student, I’ll be in a place to use textbooks!

3. Thrift & Generosity

There are many ways to be thrifty. Don’t buy things you don’t need. Find the best vaue of a product (which might not be the cheapest, but will hold you over for some time. See what you have before you buy more. And of course, learn from past shopping woes to avoid “buyer’s remorse.” I despise mentioning this a third time, but college texts are a prime example.

Despite popular opinion, thrift does not preclude generosity and giving, once your standard expenditures are taken care of. Luke 21:1-4 discusses the poor widow that gave all her money. While this is extreme, what is important to understand that it is proportional. Furthermore, better budgeting will allow for many purchases, be they donations or anything that (typically unwittingly) could lead to giving.

At the same time, helping can hurt. In many cases, charity can lead to dependency, entering a vicious cycle will demand more supply of giving. (Pardon the economic pun). On the other hand, we don’t want a whole bunch of “Scrooges” not spending anything beyond core needs.


As I leave my 20s this year, we thank the Lord that we have gotten a bunch of blessings in 2017. Pray that 2018 I will get even better wisdom from God’s Word

Putting Technology Where it (Could) Belong

Tonight, I moved the computer to a strategically better place, which happens to be the, yes, dinette set in my apartment!

Bedroom Desk
My bedroom desk, that has now become low-tech.


Computer On the DInette
The computer’s home now, where it has been previously placed.


Let’s do a “SWOT” analysis:

Strengths:  The computer is now nearby my 1981 print Britannica set (as well as a useful supplement to the modern Britannica internet service) and many other great books.  It also serves as further discipline for the lust issues (sparing the gory details, of course!) which has been, thanks to faith in God, plummeting.  And of course, many other great websites.  My room without the computer allows for quality study without the cares of the internet or other computer applications (the king of them, in my opinion, is most likely Facebook).

Weaknesses:  Many other books are in my own room, so both sites can mutually could be “lending libraries.”  In other words, not only does a book taken from the bedroom need to be returned, but a material taken to the bedroom must also be returned.

Opportunities:  Move as many books as possible from my room to this “information station,” as well as obtaining more bookcases as appropriate.  This allows one library per my apartment.  When I want to get down and dirty with such a reading or study, I shall take it to my room until I’m finished, and thus return them to the (single) home library.Threats:  While there is no loan period (after all, it’s not a true lending library, it’s hyperbole), they should be put back when I am done using them.   The key enemy here is laziness, an trait that makes the autism spectrum a liability.  Also, I put so much debt (not in money, but progress) toward books when the earlier portions are attacked by others.  Therefore, willpower aided by God and His Word will get me success.

Interestingly enough, this SWOT analysis was done after the move.  I must be a good strategic planner already!  Yet, a SWOT analysis is a very helpful tool!


A Tale of Two European Stores

A voice says, “Cry out!”
    And I said, “What shall I cry?”
All people are grass,
    their constancy is like the flower of the field.
 The grass withers, the flower fades,
    when the breath of the Lord blows upon it;
    surely the people are grass.
 The grass withers, the flower fades;
    but the word of our God will stand forever.
(Isaiah 40:6-8, NRSV)

Anyone near Philly remember the French store Carrefour? It had only two locations in the US, quite nearby each other both closed in 1994: Franklin Mills Mall (now Philadelphia Mills, started 1988), and Voorhees (a New Jersey* suburb of Philadelphia, launched 1992). Since its US demise occurred when I was only six or so, I don’t remember much of the store, except a few bits-and-pieces.  (Source: Embarrassingly enough, LOL, Wikipedia)

On the other hand, another foreign store that is wildly popular among Americans (and most likely here to stay): Sweden’s IKEA. It not only offers Scandinavian-style furniture, but offers a great cafeteria offering Swedish cuisine, including their world-famous Swedish meatballs. (Some people think their food is “doctored up,” especially people who bear Swedish descent). But who am I to speak for the Swedes? I’ve never been there! Anyway, they sell products from Sweden (and perhaps elsewhere in Scandinavia), and perhaps from kid’s tastes (or even an ultra-American adult taste, LOL), a “bistro.”
So Dolores (Dee) would you opt for the bistro, or the cafeteria? (I hope the latter).
This may be a pain sometimes, yet it may be a true blessing to speakers of languages other than Swedish. Instructions for building IKEA furniture are strictly pictorial, for they must be globally standardized.

Incidentally, building an IKEA project could be a great task for a person with high-functioning autism, who happens to be non-verbal.  But watch out!  If done in a sheltered workshop, not only might it embarrass “co-workers,” but they could get a competitive (“real”) job!  Now that’s innovation!

Also, while they do set jobs overseas, and thus it is rare to see “Made in Sweden” for an IKEA product, this really doesn’t matter, because they are willing to export worldwide!  With most likely little to owe anyone.  The US, on the other hand, only wants to import.  Maybe that caused the American demise of Carrefour, because all these French goods may have been unattractive to us (think escargot, LOL), or simply the fact that France and the US just tend not to see eye to eye.  But that’s ancient history.  If stores were a boxing or wrestling match, the competitors, in this case, IKEA and Carrefour, the latter would get lots of KO’s.  Carrefour still thrives, however, in many other countries.

But, as they say, all good things shall come to an end.  After all, IKEA didn’t expect to be this good in the USA.  They thought, “why share it with the country that has everything.”   Carrefour didn’t share that success in the US.  But who knows?  You could have too much of this good thing (namely, Swedish furniture), that is, once our country can’t stand it (not only mentally, but perhaps physically!)

Three words that are the heart and soul of economics:

Supply and demand!
*International (and some domestic) readers:  New Jersey is a separate state from Pennsylvania, which is where Philadelphia is located.  However, Pennsylvania (including Philadelphia) borders New Jersey on its east side, by the Delaware River, making much of New Jersey a suburban area to Philadelphia, together with its Pennsylvania suburbs to the west.  Alas, concerning these bridges, you have to pay tolls to cross over the river, at least in one direction.

Testimony: Three Dilemmas, All Handled by Faith

The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy. I came that they may have life and have it abundantly.  (John 10:10, ESV)

We’re going to discuss three issues I faced this morning and that a man of faith like me can handle, of course, with patience.  Unbelievers are stuck with their reasoning power, and while God imparted to all persons (Christians and otherwise), Christians have the power of faith, which goes beyond reason to solve much more profound problems that mere reasoning cannot.

  1. Missing wallet
    All this time it was under the bed, within the past few days.
  2. Could not turn on my computer with Apple password, which I have forgotten since I seldom use it.
    I called Apple, after I asked my mother what their phone number.  Upon getting to obtaining the serial number, I talked to tech support, and worked my way through the procedure.  I now have a new password for turning on my computer.  Hooray!
  3. Lack of olive oil
    Of secondary importance to breakfast, but essential for many omelets and other cooking ideas.  While I was busted, a friend brought me to a local convenience store, and bought it for me.

You can see in this testimony, “God’s sovereignty, man’s responsibility,” a central doctrine of Reformed theology (“Calvinism”), the Protestant theological tradition I belong to.  While we trust God’s is sovereign over all events of history, man is still responsible for those very deeds, that is, those which are within his control.  So despite loads of criticism (and I’m not trying to convert you to such belief), Reformed Christian doctrine, in my humble opinion,  is one of the most God-glorifying, man-humbling, and indeed beautiful expressions of Christian faith.

But in any faith tradition, always be thankful for what God does for his “sheep” (i.e., Christian believers). and to give more abundant life on earth, as well as eternity with him.

Science and Scripture Don’t (Typically) Mix

Some verses, aside from the creation narrative(s), are quite unscientific.

I give three key examples here

1) John 3:8 — Jesus’ discussion with Nicodemus about the new birth included Jesus’ statement that the wind direction cannot be detected. Yes it can, thanks to meteorology! But that didn’t exist then!

His message is that you can’t always tell the people who are saved.

2) Isa 55:10,11 – This verse suggests that rain comes down ONLY to water the plants. Well, consider the ecological concept of the water cycle and some botany. In addition to evaporation from land and bodies of water, the air moistens due to another process called transpiration, wherein the stomata (pores) in leaves open to cool it, albeit perhaps at the expense of photosynthetic efficiency. Together, all evaporative processes are thus known as evapotranspiration, and has its sharpest effects in arid conditions.

All Isaiah said, living long before this science was known, in the next verse was that God’s word will do its will.

3) 1 Cor 15:36, 37 – Paul says that seeds must “die” to germinate. Well, they may be dormant, but the actual pending plant (the embryo), needs water, as well as food storages in its cotyledons (aka “seed leaves”). Once the seed does germinate, the cotyledons are the jump-starter before the plant starts to truly photosynthesize, and thereupon the cotyledons wither.

Paul is discussing resurrection of the body, not botanical principles.

These are just three of many unscientific points in Scripture that should corroborate its true purpose. Only some may be strongly interested in science, but all people need to know Scripture. AMEN

An Encouraging Word for Aging Minds

Disclaimer:  Information only.  Not medical advice.  Check with your doctor for more on this.

Like all people leaving their 20s, the monitoring of their health — in all aspects — is paramount.  And it will continue to be such for life, not to mention more so.  WebMD said (in a quiz on the site) that memory in different forms declines in the late 20s!  This is a wakeup call for me, already 29 years old.

This evening, in my beloved Britannica set, I decided to investigate aging and its impact on memory.  While the set is quite dated (1981) and research has increased since then, the article said, overall, the primary aspects affected are short-term memory and response timing.  On the other hand, cognitive decline is trivial concerning skills, facts, and vocabulary.

In other words, the aged actually learn just as well as younger adults.  Here’s the catch.  They tend to learn the material more slowly.

This provides some good news here, in case a senior citizen wants to learn something. But a younger person should teach it slowly, so the elder will retain it well.  In other words, go easy on them!  Don’t pressure them too much.

Also, while there are exceptions, the rule of thumb is that people in their, say, 30s, tend to make major contributions in science, math, etc. more often that 60-somethings.  This rule of thumb is reverse for religious, political, and administrative personalities, wherein experience is the principal factor.

And, despite their tendency to “keep to themselves,” due primarily to past experience, older adults are happiest when accompanied by those younger than them, and would rather stay in their communities rather than in institutions for seniors (e.g. nursing homes and assisted living facilities).  Good income and health contribute as well.

Of course, there’s Alzheimer’s and similar dementia disorders, but they are beyond the scope of this post.  This is focused chiefly on the brain power overall aged population.

Keep in mind that as one reaches the end, while learning is lifelong by nature, it becomes less and less important, namely concerning applications of such.  In another post sometime, I would like to discuss learning theories.  But this will suffice for now.

But again, like many others, age is what it is — a number.

Source:  Encyclopedia Britannica, 1981, v. 1 (Macropedia)